University of California-San Diego

IDENTITY THEFT RX.pdf

Issue link: http://interactive.legacybrochure.com/i/514875

Contents of this Issue

Navigation

Page 2 of 2

© The Stelter Company The information in this publication is not intended as legal or tax advice. For such advice, please consult an attorney or tax advisor. Figures cited in examples are for hypothetical purposes only and are subject to change. References to estate and income taxes include federal taxes only. State income/estate taxes or state law may impact your results. Office of Gift Planning Danielle R. Dawson, JD, MBA Executive Director of Development 9500 Gilman Drive #0937 La Jolla, CA 92093 (858) 822-6619 ddawson@ucsd.edu Learn More For more information and helpful resources about identity theft, visit www.ftc.gov/idtheft. You can also call the FTC identity theft hotline toll free at (877) 438-4338. Signs That You've Been Targeted 1 ] A creditor or bank informs you that it received an application for credit with your name and Social Security number. 2 ] You receive notice that you've been approved or denied by a creditor to which you never applied. 3 ] You receive unauthorized credit cards, utility or telephone statements in your name and address. 4 ] You no longer receive your credit card statements, or your statements include unauthorized charges. 5 ] Not all of your mail is delivered to you. 6 ] A collection agency notifies you that it is collecting for a defaulted account that was established with your identity but that you didn't open. Act Quickly to Minimize Impact If you believe you are a victim of stolen identity, immediately contact the fraud department of one of the three national consumer reporting agencies. The agency will place a fraud alert on your account, which requests that creditors contact you before opening any new accounts or making changes to your existing accounts. Once the agency confirms your fraud alert, the other two agencies will be automatically notified to place fraud alerts on your account, and all three will send you free credit reports. Close accounts you know or believe have been tampered with, and use the Federal Trade Commission's (FTC) ID Theft Affidavit to dispute unauthorized new accounts. The affidavit is available online at www.ftc.gov/idtheft. Select "Sample Letters and Forms for Victims of Identity Theft" and download the affidavit located under "Forms."

Articles in this issue

Links on this page

Archives of this issue

view archives of University of California-San Diego - IDENTITY THEFT RX.pdf